PED 4177

Course outline for Teaching Senior English, Winter 2021

The youth raised in a global society with teachings and wisdom from all over the world — these kids who live with story and yes, with technology that can bring them into other communities and homes — these leaders will understand within a broader context that includes and, in some cases, is centred around, Indigenous knowledge — they will bring true reconciliation.

Cherie Dimaline, 2017

So if you want to know how to teach, begin by remembering how to learn — and never stop.

Jim Burke, 2013

It is precisely because education was the primary tool of oppression of Aboriginal people, and miseducation of all Canadians, that we have concluded that education holds the key to reconciliation.

Murray Sinclair, 2014

You are in the midst of an Indigenous renaissance. Are you ready to hear the truth that needs to be told? Are you ready to see the things that need to be seen?

Jeremy Dutcher, 2019

Professor: Linda Radford, PhD
Office Hours: virtually anytime or by appointment
Office Location: LMX 342
E-mail: @uottawa.ca
Class location: LMX 240
Class time: Fridays, 8:30am – 11:30am


I. Course Description 

Introduction to teaching English at the senior division. This will include the impact of the particular discipline on the whole learner; individualized instruction; theoretical framework and pedagogical implications; critical examination and interpretation of relevant curriculum guidelines; development of programs; analysis and application of specific teaching strategies and techniques unique to the discipline; and evaluation procedures and techniques.

II. Course Objectives

This course delves into two essential questions:

  • How do I create a senior English class that meets the needs of students and inspires them to be responsible and productive citizens by engaging in a lifetime of critical practices for social change? 
  • How do I ensure that the texts I am teaching does not objectify Indigenous people (cultures, histories and ways of being and knowing) vs provoking  young readers to understand ourselves and our place in the world?

PED 4177 has the following learning expectations for candidates:

  • Explore and question our own sense of power and privilege through deepening our reading practices that embrace ethical relationality (Donald, 2012) in regards to how our psychic and social histories collide
  • Take up Indigenous epistemologies and ontologies which recognize dynamic relations and interrelations
  • Gain an understanding of the nature of learning
  • Understand and implement Ministry of Education curriculum expectations and Ministry of Education and district school board policies and guidelines related to the senior division, which includes its commitment to the Calls to Action of the Truth and Reconciliation Commision of Canada
  • Have the theoretical understanding and foundation necessary to design, implement and assess programs for the senior division student
  • Understand how to use, accommodate and modify expectations, strategies and assessment practices based on the development or special needs to the senior division student
  • Create learning environments conducive to the intellectual, social, emotional, physical, linguistic, cultural, spiritual and moral development of the senior division student
  • Work collaboratively with in-school personnel, parents/guardians, and the community
  • Access a variety of resources, including technological resources, within and beyond the educational system to enhance and support student learning
  • Demonstrate the ability to integrate information and communication technology into teaching practice
  • Demonstrate an openness to innovation and change
  • Inquire into practice through reflection, active engagement and collaboration

III. Schedule of Classes

Date Guiding QuestionsClass schedule: Learning Intentions & Success CriteriaModule Work
Week 1: January 31Why does what we teach and how we teach it matter? Learning Intentions:Draw out  prior knowledge in regards to Indigenous Education
Engage in Spark Reading and Writing “Which of the eight personae from Burke’s intro best represents your view as an English teacher? Jigsaw NBE3 Curriculum (using various recent Op Ed pieces about the new NBE3 course – teacher/student/public opinion)Introduction to The Marrow Thieves
Success CriteriaComplete Quick Write Choose a text for multiliteracies circle work. Record expectation for participation in listening to Knowledge Keepers from KZ
Burke – Chapter 1 What We Teach & Chapter 2 Who We TeachPrepare to respond in spark writing activity.
Week 2: February 7What does the work of teaching have to do with my own positionality and becoming an adept listener?Guest led workshop: Read for this class & Respond in Learning Log:Heath Justice (2018). Stories that Wound, Stories that Heal pp. 1-26Learning intentionsEngage in learning with Knowledge Keepers/Elders from Kitigan Zibi ( the Cote family)
Success Criteria:Marrow Thieves – p. 1-51 (Book)Take jot notes for blog post in response to learning experienceReading TBA & quick write response 
Burke – Chapter 5: Teaching Reading Submit completed module table template to Brightspace 
Week 3: February 14
How am I using an inquiry stance to support my learning about First Nations, Metis, and Inuit perspectives? Read for this class:Spark Reading Survival: Cherie Dimaline – Marrow Thieves – p. 52-99  (Book)
Do for this class:Lit Circle Work (reading ⅓ of your novel, plus your assigned role duties)
Burke – Chapter 6: Speaking and Listening Submit completed module table template to Brightspace 
Week 4: February 21
What viewpoints are being expressed by the authors of the texts I am reading in my MLC circle?  Read for this class:Spark Reading Just transition means returning Indigenous land – but that might look different than you thinkMarrow Thieves – p. 100-160 (Book)
Do for this class:Spark Reading TBALit Circle Work (reading ⅓ of your novel, plus your assigned role duties)
Burke – Chapter 4: Teaching Writing Submit completed module table template to Brightspace  
Week 5: February 28
In what ways are the texts I am reading in my MLC circle attempting to reassert FNMI perspectives?Read for this class:Spark Reading Read over the introduction to the NBE3 curriculum pages 7-11 and strand A 117 – 122. What are some of the ideas that emerge for you in regards to working with The Marrow Thieves and the big ideas of the curriculum and overall expectations in strand.Marrow Thieves – p. 161 – 234 (Book)
Do for this class:Lit Circle Work (reading ⅓ of your novel, plus your assigned role duties)
Burke – Chapter 3: How to Teach So Students Will Learn, Use, Remember…and Enjoy Submit completed module table template to Brightspace
Week 6: March 6What will be the generative topic & essential question of our curriculum & assessment plan and why will students engaged? 

Read for this classSpark Reading: Read the introduction to the resource Read – Listen – Tell pages 1-11.  Respond to what strikes you as useful in preparing to develop a C & A plan from the work you have done in your multiliteracies circle.  
Learning IntentionsConsider and work through possibilities for guiding question Commit to overall curriculum expectationsDevelop and write summative task
Success CriteriaComplete Curriculum and Assessment template for tasks above
Do for this class:Multiliteracies Circle Report due this classCollaborative C&A plan
Burke Chapter 8: Assessing and Grading Student Learning and WorkSubmit completed module table template to Brightspace 
Weeks 7:March 13How will I provoke interest in this inquiry?  What learning situations will I need to develop in the proceeding lessons to support the knowledge and skills students need to develop their competencies?
Guest speaker Chantal Verner
Learning IntentionsDevelop introductory lesson for C & A planPlan and begin to complete proceeding lesson plans (each group member is responsible for two lessons) 
Success CriteriaComplete Curriculum and Assessment template and lesson plan template for tasks above.
Burke: Chapter 7: Language Study: Vocabulary, Grammar, and Style Submit completed module table template to Brightspace 
Week 8: March 27 How have we accomplished our goal of creating an engaging learning experience that will allow students to successfully perform their understanding and skill development in the summative task?
ReadSpark Reading TBA
Learning IntentionsReview summative task and if lessons in C&A plan adequately prepare students to perform their knowledge and skills Revise lesson plans Write a 500 word rationale in regards to how this C&A plan fulfills curriculum expectations and attempts to create a dynamic learning experience for students. 
Success CriteriaComplete Curriculum and Assessment template and lesson plan template for tasks above.
Week 9:  April 3What can I share about my curriculum and assessment plan that might be interesting to teachers in the field?  What will I share in terms of my own experience of learning through Indigenous perspectives?Learning Intentions:Learn from each others C&A plan workShare what struck you the most during this journey of learning through indigenous perspective
Success CriteriaComplete Curriculum and Assessment template and lesson plan template for tasks above.Flipgrid thoughts about learning through Indigenous perspectives

Important Note of Thanks: This course was developed and written with inspiration and feedback from a number of Indigenous and non-Indigenous colleagues, teachers, and friends.

IV. Required Textbooks and Resource Materials

Burke, J. (2013). The English teacher’s companion: A completely new guide to classroom, curriculum, and the profession.  Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. 

Dimaline, C. ( 2017). The Marrow Thieves. Toronto, ON: Dancing Cat Books.

Depending on which lit circle you are part of you will need one of these texts or one not on this list by an Indigenous author that your group would like to read: 

  • Motorcycles & Sweetgrass by Drew Hayden Taylor *
  • The Outside Circle Patti LaBoucane-Benson • Kelly Mellings.  *
  • Indian Horse by Richard Wagamese  *
  • Medicine Walk by Richard Wagamese  *
  • The Marrow Thieves by Cherie Dimaline  *
  • Rez Sisters by Tomson Highway
  • The Round House by Louise Erdich
  • The Lesser Blessed by Richard Van Camp 
  • Where the Blood Mixes by Kevin Loring    *
  • Up Ghost River by Edmund Metatawabin
  • The Break by Katherena Vermette              *
  • Starlight by Richard Wagamese
  • Jonny Appleseed by Joshua Whitehead
  • The Moon of Letting Go by Richard Van Camp
  • Night Moves by Richard Van Camp
  • Glass Beads by Dawn Dumont *Short stories
  • Seven Fallen Feathers by Tanya Talaga *Non Fiction  
  • My Conversations With Canadians by Lee Maracle Non Fiction
  • The Right to Be Cold by Shiela Watt-Cloutier  Non Fiction 

We will make frequent reference to the Ministry of Education curriculum documents, which are available from http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/teachers/curriculum.html

V. Assignments and Evaluation Methods

The final grade will be based upon three assignments. 

1. Learning Log (20%)  

This writing portfolio includes: 

a) Spark reading and writing work – The learning log, which will be housed in a Google document (shared by Linda), will be for your ongoing work in the course. You will be asked to do “spark reading” in class, and will be asked to participate in quick writes in response to the readings. The readings, with a few exceptions, will be used to help us engage more deeply with indigenous voices and texts. 

b) Digital Hub Work (3 submissions online) – The digital hub work will be the submission of three blog posts that emerge from the readings, work we do in class and course experiences.  Link the “spark readings”, the texts, and work in our course with your own. Choose three out of the four options:

  1. One submission about linking the “spark readings”, the texts, and work in our course with your own reading and teaching practices.
  2. One submission about understanding form and style in regards to a particular text forms, text features, and stylistic elements in texts from FNMI literature to demonstrate an understanding of how these help create meaning. 
  3. One submission about the Oral Tradition overall expectations (perhaps relate this to the Knowledge Keepers experience from KZ). 
  4. One submission about your understanding of one or a variety of media texts from FNMI cultures, and how the conventions and techniques associated with them are used to create meaning.

2. Multiliteracies Literature Circle (25%)

In groups of 3, literature circles will be assigned by the professor, to work together for all literature circle discussions and activities. Clear roles and responsibilities will be established. See roles sheet in your MLC template (shared by Linda) for specific responsibilities. When submitting any work to Brightspace, make sure to keep working with the same document and re-upload it to each appropriate section on Brightspace.  Any work not completed during class, will need to be completed before the next meeting. 

Key components:

·      Rotating roles and responsibilities

·      All members responsible for reading/watching required readings and group supplemental resources and participate in the collaborative mind mapping exercise. 

·      A literature circle report will be developed into which all resources, guiding questions, discussion notes and reflection on the discussion process.

At the end of the course you will write a brief report (2 – 3  pages – double spaced) on your engagement and participation in the literature circle community discussions. What was your experience of studying a novel as a community of learners?  What have you learned about yourself as a reader and maker of meaning? How were you challenged and/or supported in this process?   How is making meaning through dialogue and reading connected?  What did you bring to the literature circle process? What would you do differently?  How has this contributed to your classroom practice? What adaptations would you make? As part of your report, you will be asked to self- and peer-evaluate in terms of your engagement, participation, and contribution to the circles.

3. Collaborative Curriculum and Assessment Plan for Grade 11 Understanding Contemporary First Nations, Métis and Inuit Voices: Introduction (35%)

As a lit circle group, you will be contributing to the creation of a collaborative Curriculum and Assessment Plan (C&A) that focuses on instructional strategies and evidence of assessment across the strands for the new Grade 11 Understanding Contemporary First Nations, Metis and Inuit Voices course.   Together you will develop a complete C & A plan following the templates provided and use a variety of texts (more than three) such as at least one short story, poem(s), novel, media texts, cultural text forms,  and or nonfiction.  Each C & A plan will use the backward design model and draw on strategies gathered from Burke and/or others introduced in PED 3177 & 4177. This assignment will provide you with an opportunity to become more familiar with developing curriculum for this new course using the approach of critical meaning making and generative topics that we will focus on this term. Remember, differentiated learning is foundational in all planning and assessment.  

In class, we will spend time working on your collaborative C&A plan, you will be required to complete different check in activities that provide the opportunity to reflect on your individual and group goals and process.  This mandatory yet non-evaluated component to the collaborative C&A Plan will be considered Assessment as Learning (AaL).

As a group, you will be responsible for:

  1. Deciding on which overall expectations across the strands that will be your C&A plan’s focus. 
  2. An essential question that guides the C & A Plan in its entirety
  3. The culminating assessment task & tool (Assessment of Learning) with student hand-out/instructions
  4. An introductory lesson plan with clearly stated learning intentions, success criteria and appropriate instructional strategy.
  5. Completed C&A plan template 
  6. A 300-500 word response that includes a rationale for your choice of essential question, how the individual lesson plans lead to the culminating task, your choice of culminating assessment of learning task, and your choice of varied instructional innovations. Also, explain the pertinence between the assessment plan for diagnosing/giving feedback to learners/adjusting teaching, as well as the coherence between all selected elements: Specific expectations, evidence of learning, instructional and assessment strategies.

Individually, you will be responsible for 

  1. Three lesson plans that:
  • Builds on the essential question 
  • States clear learning intentions/success criteria
  • Uses & describes a different instructional strategy that clearly matches the learning intention for the lesson. Use at least one of Burke’s instructional strategies per lesson
  • Provides a task & tool for ‘Assessment for Learning’ (AfL)  

4. Module Work (20%)

As the mandatory 9 hours of additional instruction/module work, you will be asked to read specific Burke book chapters on a weekly basis (see schedule for chapters). You will then fill in the table (see Brightspace for the template) about which instructional strategies you see being used, how you see yourself using these instructional strategies in your teaching practice, and how you connect to Burke’s narrative.  When submitting the tables to Brightspace, make sure to keep working with the same document and re-upload it to each appropriate section on Brightspace (week 1-9 will be in the same document). During week 9, you will submit a one page response, double-spaced, about how Burke has influenced your pedagogy of teaching English Language Arts. 

Each week where a Burke chapter is assigned, submit the module work table template to Brightspace. 

Make-up assignment: In two double-spaced typed pages respond to the required readings assigned for the missed class. If there are no readings listed for the class, consult the Professor. Consider such factors as questions, comments, intrapersonal responses, links to other works, connections to practice and theory, etc. Be sure to include the date at the top of the page. Be sure to be thoughtful and informative. 

Additionally, if you miss one of the MLC weeks, you are still required to submit your role work via your shared Google doc so members of your group can have the discussion. You are responsible to catching up with your group members on what you missed during the discussion. 

VI. Attendance

Due to the concentrated nature of the Teacher Education Program and the considerable public responsibility inherent in the profession of teaching, attendance at all classes in the B. Ed. program is compulsory. Many of the objectives for this course are achieved during class time. Most classes include activities or discussions that enable students to contribute to the professional development of everyone in the class. As required by the Ontario College of Teachers and indicated in the Teacher Education Calendar, attendance is mandatory in the Teacher Education Program and will be recorded during each class.

Of course, circumstances may occasionally arise which makes attendance impossible. In the event that you must be absent, students must inform the professor by telephone or e-mail either prior to the class or as soon after the class as possible. The professor will provide an assignment/task designed to ensure that the student meets the objectives of that class and he/she will require a written response from the student. The nature of this assignment and the due date for submission will be determined by the professor. Students who are absent on the submission date for an assignment are expected to submit the assignment through an alternative means on the due date (i.e. email). Assignments received after the due date will be considered late assignments (see below). Students who exhibit a pattern of irregular attendance will be brought to the attention of the Program Director and will be required to show cause why they should be allowed to undertake the practicum and/or continue in the program.

VII. Late Assignment Policy

Assignments, which are submitted after the due date without an agreed-upon extension, are considered late assignments. The penalty on late assignments in all courses in the Teacher Education Program amounts to a grade loss of 5% per day up to a maximum of 10 days, after which time assignments will not be accepted.

Failure to submit assignments results in a grade of “EIN” (Failure/Incomplete).

Such symbol is equivalent to a grade of “F” (failure with no make-up).    

VIII. Academic Fraud

Plagiarism is one type of academic fraud. A student found guilty of committing plagiarism will be subject to sanctions, which range from receiving a mark of “F” for the work in question, to being expelled from the University, and even the revocation of a degree, diploma, or certificate already awarded.

For more information about University regulations related to plagiarism and other types of academic fraud, please see the section entitled “Academic Fraud” in the Teacher Education Calendar, the Professional Development Programs Calendar, or the Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies Calendar.”

For useful guidelines to help you avoid plagiarism, please consult the following web page: http://web5.uottawa.ca/mcs-smc/academicintegrity/regulation.php.

IX. Access Service: For students needing adaptive measures

If barriers might prevent you from integrating into university life and you may need adaptive measures to progress (physical setting, accommodations for assignments, arrangements for exams, learning strategies, etc.), contact Access Service right away: 

• in person at the Desmarais Building, Room 3172, Laurier Avenue East;

• online at https://web3.uottawa.ca/sass/apps/ventus/student/

• by phone at 613-562-5976 – TTY: 613-562-5214.

Access Service designs services and implements measures to break down barriers that would otherwise impede the learning process for students with health problems (mental or physical), visual impairments or blindness, hearing impairments or deafness, permanent or temporary disabilities, or learning disabilities. It is the responsibility of the student to register with access services in order to receive adaptive measures. For more information about the services available, please see the guide at http://www.sass.uottawa.ca/access/students/.

X. Grading Framework

A+ Exceptional 90-100%An exceptional grade in a course or on an assignment is given for a response that demonstrates a thorough knowledge of all relevant concepts and techniques. The response is complete in content and presented in a clear, coherent and effective manner. In addition, an exceptional response adds something novel and original which distinguishes an A+ from a n A. Exceptional responses are rarely encountered as they are, by definition, outstanding among other responses.
A Exemplary 85-89%An exemplary grade in a course or on an assignment is given for a response that demonstrates a thorough knowledge of all relevant concepts and techniques. The response is complete in its content, with a clear and coherent presentation designed to communicate effectively.
A- Excellent 80-84%An excellent grade in a course or on an assignment is given for a response that demonstrates a thorough knowledge of relevant concepts and techniques. The response is largely complete in its content and clearly presented. However, some minor aspect of the assignment, which may pertain to content or effective communication, is lacking.
B+ Very Good 75-79% A very good grade in a course or on an assignment is given for a response that demonstrates adequate knowledge of relevant concepts and techniques. The response is both informative and clearly presented. However, the response is incomplete, as some substantive aspect of the assignment has been overlooked.
B Good 70-74% A good grade in a course or on an assignment is given for a response that demonstrates adequate knowledge of relevant concepts and techniques. However, the response is incomplete, as some substantive aspect of the assignment has been overlooked. In addition, there are difficulties with effective communication.
C+ Satisfactory 65-69% A satisfactory grade in a course or on an assignment is given for a response that demonstrates basic knowledge of relevant concepts and techniques. A substantive aspect of the assignment has been overlooked. In addition, the difficulties with effective communication result in a lack of clarity such that readers or listeners struggle to get the information.
C Pass 60-64% A pass grade in a course or on an assignment is given for a response that demonstrates incomplete knowledge of relevant concepts and techniques. A substantive aspect of the assignment has been overlooked. In addition, the difficulties with effective communication result in a lack of clarity such that readers or listeners struggle to get the information.
Redeemable Failure E1 40 – 59% The category of redeemable failure demonstrates an unacceptable level of knowledge of concepts and/or techniques to satisfy the requirements of an assignment or course. Student teachers receiving a redeemable failure have the right to one supplemental examination in which they must obtain 60% standing to be successful. Supplemental examinations consist of a written examination or additional assignments.
Nonredeemable Failure 0-39% (F) A non-redeemable failure demonstrates an unacceptable level of knowledge of concepts and/or techniques to satisfy the requirements of an assignment or course. No supplemental examination and/or assignments are offered.
ABS  Absent 
EIN Failure/Incomplete

E1 Redeemable failure in the Faculty of Education. 

Note: All grades below “C” are failing grades for undergraduate students in the Faculty of Education. 

A grade of “E” (failure with the right to a make-up) means that the students must pass the make-up assignment(s) or examination as determined by the professor in consultation with the Director of Teacher Education. If the student passes the makeup assignment(s) or examination, the new mark will be entered on the transcript. If the student fails, an “F” (failure with no makeup) will be entered on the transcript. 

A grade of “F” (failure with no make-up) for a course results in the compulsory withdrawal of the student from the program and the Faculty.

XI. Faculty of Education Regulation on Professional Ethics

As future teachers, graduates of the Faculty of Education’s Bachelor of Education and Certificate of Education programs will be responsible for the physical safety, the psychological health and educational well being of students (children, adolescent or adult) in schools. While the Faculty of Education recognizes that its teacher candidates are learning their professional responsibilities as teachers, it expects all of its teacher candidates to demonstrate that they have the knowledge, attitudes and capacities needed to be responsible for the physical safety, the psychological health and educational well being of students (children, adolescent or adult) before they are placed in a school or other practice teaching situation. It further expects that they will at all times demonstrate care, integrity, respect and trust in their interactions with each other in their university classes, with the representatives of the Faculty of Education and during their practicum with students (children, adolescent or adult), parents, other teachers, principals, other school personnel and with members of the public. Professional behaviour in university classes includes full participation in class, attentive listening to colleagues, respectful interactions, and creating a caring, trusting environment for learning.

Please consult the Student Handbook (http://www.education.uottawa.ca/assets/teguide.pdf) for the complete Faculty of Education Regulation on Professional Ethics. All students should familiarize themselves with this policy and its implications.

XII. University of Ottawa Sexual Violence Policy

The University of Ottawa does not tolerate any form of sexual violence. Sexual violence refers to any act of a sexual nature committed without consent, such as rape, sexual harassment or on-line harassment. The university, as well as students and employee associations offers a full range of resources and services allowing members of our community to receive information and confidential assistance and providing for a procedure to report an incident or make a complaint. For more information, visit www.uOttawa.ca/sexual-violence-support-and-prevention.